• 2 December 2020

    As much as we wait for Christ’s arrival at Christmas, we also wait for his arrival at the end of time. So if we aren’t so good at waiting in line or for a deadline, how good are you at waiting for Christ’s return?

  • 2 December 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Esther

    If there were a slam against the book of Esther it might be that it doesn’t seem very spiritual. Besides the questionable (at best) behaviors of the characters, there is no mention of God throughout the book. The book might seem like a series of coincidences more than anything else. But the book of Esther is the working of God from our perspective.

  • 8 November 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: 2 Kings

    It’s easy to feel beaten up and defeated these days. Fear is an exceptionally draining emotion, it tires us out, we see the obstacles in front of us and in our weariness we deem them insurmountable. Here is why fear is so draining: because in the process we turn our eyes away from the Lord and we oscillate between fear and defeatism. And if that is the case where are we putting our faith?

  • 1 November 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Genesis

    Where a catastrophe is a sudden turn of events which results in disaster, a eucatastrophe is a sudden turn of events which results in good. He said that it is the “sudden happy turn in a story which pierces you with a joy which brings tears.” As J.R.R. Tolkien looked at the Bible he saw one big eucatastrophe in fact he said that the incarnation, Jesus becoming human and entering into history, was the eucatastrophe of human history. Because that was the moment where everything starts to change for the better. There’s a grand eucatastrophe in the story of Joseph. I wonder if you can tell what it is.

  • 25 October 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Philippians

    An attitude of rejoicing is not easy to come by. The Apostle Paul seems to think that it is a pretty important aspect of Christians life. Again and again the Apostle Paul encourages Christians to rejoice. He is unabashed in his encouragement to take on the attitude of joy, and lest the Philippians begin to think that he is needlessly repeating himself he says, “Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!”

  • 18 October 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Philippians

    Paul says, “I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.” The prize is life forever in the presence of God, but what exactly is the goal that Paul is referring to? It’s more than just to cross the finish line. That would be too low of a goal. In fact, the goal is a God given goal. Paul spoke about it in the previous verses–the goal is to know Christ more and more fully.

  • 11 October 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Ezekiel

    When something bad happens do you ever find yourself looking for whose fault it is? The Israelites had a communal view of life, they could let themselves off the hook for their personal sin because they were a part of a greater community that had been chosen by God. We however live in an individualistic society, and so you would think that we would be much more comfortable with taking personal accountability and yet we aren’t. But because we are individualistic, accepting blame could tarnish the view both that I have of myself and that others have of me.

  • 4 October 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Jonah

    It makes sense that Jonah was outside the city in the shelter, he couldn’t help himself. Because maybe, just maybe, God would change his mind and Jonah could watch the fireworks. It wouldn’t though because God’s mercy was just too great and that is what made Jonah want to die. Do you ever find yourself thinking that God’s mercy is just too much? Do you ever find yourself claiming God’s unlimited mercy for yourself while also limiting it to others?

  • 27 September 2020

    Speaker: Aaron Goetzinger

    Book: Matthew

    Forgiving is hard work. In order to forgive, we often believe that we need to be owed something in order to forgive the person. If we don’t receive something we know it will cost us. Yet Jesus tells us that we should forgive endlessly. He knew best of all what forgiveness costs. Forgiveness always starts with the forgiver. It starts with our forgiveness given to us by Christ.